Eating Animals Now in the Classroom

As articles in the New York Times1 and the Chronicle of Higher Education2 reveal, the study of animals and their multi-faceted, intricate, and intimate relations to humans is a growing social and scholarly concern. It is no surprise then that immediately after topping the New York Times bestseller list, Eating Animals began to reshape classroom discussions on industrial animal agriculture around the world.

Increasing the reach of what we believe is one of the most powerful cases against factory farming ever written to young people across the globe, Farm Forward is now working with select high school teachers and university professors who already use Eating Animals in their classrooms to develop and share discipline-specific support materials for all educators. In addition, we are also offering periodic virtual visits to classrooms by Foer himself via videoconference technology.

Eating Animals is intelligent, yet accessible and personal . . . [The book] helps students achieve the veritable Holy Grail of learning objectives: critical thought." –Scott Warfe, Professor, Diablo Valley College

In Fall 2011, Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill made it required reading for all incoming freshmen. Duke Today explains that "a 21-member selection committee of students, faculty and staff from both universities chose the book from six finalists. Students on the committee described Eating Animals as an even-handed review of the food industry."3

In a first-of-its-kind educational initiative, we will creatively address the issues that often accompany the animal-agriculture debate, including: the social and environmental responsibilities of business in the interests of community and the world; intersections of pollution, resources, industry, and meat-production; the ethics of animal consumption; discrepancies between what the law demands and what advocates and consumers feel is humane; and inquiries about animal capabilities and rights.

  1. 1. James Gorman, “Animal Studies Cross Campus to Lecture Hall,” New York Times, January 3, 2012 (accessed January 10, 2012)
  2. 2. Tom Bartlett, “Seeing is Believing,” The Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov 27, 2011 (accessed January 20, 2012)
  3. 3. "Duke, UNC Choose ‘Eating Animals’ for Summer Reading," Duke Today, 22 Feb. 2011, available here.

Cows and Calves

Cattle are the only farmed animals that typically spend part of their lives unconfined and outdoors. Does that mean cattle raised for beef have the best lives of any farmed animal?

Join our mailing list to receive a monthly newsletter that will keep you involved with our nation’s most exciting and promising efforts to transform the way we eat.

Pigs

More than 97 percent of America’s hog farmers have been driven out of business, but we’re producing more pork than ever. Genetically engineered pigs raised in intensive confinement have become the industry standard. How did it happen?

Join our mailing list to receive a monthly newsletter that will keep you involved with our nation’s most exciting and promising efforts to transform the way we eat.

Poultry

Americans eat more than 100 times as much chicken meat as we did a century ago. But the whopping 9 billion chickens we eat each year are genetically engineered, drugged, and sick. What happened?

  • Anything Goes - Chickens are the most abused of all farmed animals, and yet they are completely unprotected under US federal law.
  • Chicken vs. Chimp - New studies suggest chickens have some intellectual abilities that surpass primates. Is it true?
  • Chickens and Turkeys Raised Right - Meet America’s last poultry farmer.

Join our mailing list to receive a monthly newsletter that will keep you involved with our nation’s most exciting and promising efforts to transform the way we eat.

Sea Animals

Fish factory farms and industrial fishing are emptying our oceans. In some industries, up to 98 percent of the sea animals caught are thrown back, dead, as "bycatch." Can we fish better?

Join our mailing list to receive a monthly newsletter that will keep you involved with our nation’s most exciting and promising efforts to transform the way we eat.

Join our mailing list...

Privacy Policy
  • Twitter
    popup tail
  • Facebook
    popup tail
  • Facebook
    popup tail
Donate to Farm Forward